What are Opioids? Who is at risk?

Opioids are used for long-term management of chronic pain. Individuals who use Heroin or misuse prescription Opioid medications are at risk of overdose.

Utah is 5th in the nation for overdose deaths

*There are different types of opiates/opioids that people use, and that children are exposed to in their homes. All of these are capable of leading to overdose and death. They include:

  • Oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percodan, Percocet, Tylox)
  • Hyodrocodone (Lortab, Vicodin, Hycodan, Lorcet, Vicoprofen, Hycet, Norco)
  • Methadone
  • Morphine
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Codeine (Fioricet, tylenol #3)
  • Oxymorphone (Opana)
  • Fentanyl (Duragesic)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)
  • Buprenorphine (Suboxone, Subutex, Butrans)
  • Counterfeit opioids (u-47700, pink)
  • Heroin

What are signs of an Opioid overdose?

  • Unconsciousness or inability to awaken
  • Slow or shallow breathing
  • Fingernails or lips turning blue/purple
  • Very small pupils (black circle in the middle of the eye)

How does Naloxone/Narcan work?

Naloxone belongs to a category of drugs known as opioid antagonists, meaning they bind to the same opioid receptors as synthetic opioids but do not activate the receptors or cause any psychoactive effects. By taking the place of the opioid on the opioid receptor, antagonists reverse an opioid’s effect. If administered quickly and at a sufficient dose, naloxone and other opioid antagonists are effective against all opioids regardless of their potency.

Will the person administering the Naloxone have liability implications?

NO

On December 8, 2016, the executive director of the Utah Department of Health signed a statewide standing order allowing to dispense naloxone, without a prior prescription, to anyone at increased risk of experiencing or witnessing an overdose. Through this standing order, anyone can walk into a pharmacy and purchase naloxone without a prescription. Also, refer to Utah Code 26-55-101.

Doesn’t using Naloxone lead to increased abuse of Opioids?

NO, Studies have found that providing naloxone kits does not lead to increased abuse or riskier use of opioids and can actually lead to increased enrollment in drug treatment.

Where can I find a pharmacy to purchase a kit?

Visit www.utahnaloxone.org

Where can I find more information?